Vested Capital
Vested Capital

Episode 29 · 1 week ago

(EP29): Arthur Menard, CEO And Founder Of Lambs, Radiation Protection Clothing DTC Brand And 8-Figure Business

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Arthur Menard is the CEO and co-founder of Lambs, a clothing brand that blocks 99% of EMFs (cellphone, 4G, 5G, Wifi, Bluetooth radiation) as well as 10x the amount of UVs compared to traditional clothing.

His company is doing 8-figures in sales, having got their start selling men's underwear online -- which I actually purchased several years ago.

Arthur has an interesting backstory, having first got started as an entrepreneur selling online training, then later co-founding a local marketing app supporting French bakeries. 

The story behind Lambs however, is the most interesting, given he was blazing a trail with a new form of clothing.

If you're selling anything DTC (direct to consumer) or looking to invent a new category, this podcast will be insightful.

Enjoy the interview.

Yaro

Podcast: https://www.yaro.blog/pod/

Blog: https://www.yaro.blog/

Hey there, this is Yaro and welcome tovested capital Episode Number Twenty Nine featuring my guest, Arthur, Manard,basio and Co founder of lambs vested capital is a podcast about how peoplemake money and put their capital to work. I interview start up foundersAngel Investors, venture capitalists, Crypto and Stock Traders, real estateinvestors and leaders in technology. So I don't know if you're aware of thecompany lambs it's a clothing company that initially started by providingmen's underwear with a material in in it that would protect the body fromradiation, in particular cell phone radiation or wireless radiation. Iactually came across this product, I'm not sure when it was a couple of yearsago, and I bought some of the underwear as a health conscious person and thatsomeone who already put my phone on to airplane Mo whenever I would wear it onmy body. This was a product I understood, and it made sense to me.You know fast forward to a couple of weeks ago and we get a booking for mycompany in box ton to do a discovery. Call with the CO founder and CEO oflambs- and I was like Oh that's- exciting. This is a company now and aproduct I bought from, and I actually brought a pair of my underwear with mewhen we did the discovery call. You know over zoom just to show the founderthat I have some of his underwear s. We had a bit of chuckle about that, butthen I was surprised as Arthur goes on. To tell me during this discovery, callthat he actually listened to this podcast. I don't know something aboutten years ago. Obviously I had a different name back. Then it was theentrepreneur's journey podcast, but it was still me doing it and it was one ofthe places where he got inspired to start his very first business, whichyou were here about in this interview. He was in the online education space,helping students get better at studying and he actually had an online coursethat he sells and it still sells to day. Incredibly, it's a hundred percentautomated business, so you hear about how he set that up and why he decidedto get into the education space as his first business. You also hear aboutArthur's next business, which was in the APP space so that created an APPcalled one APP. When I say day it's himself and his brother and you'll hearabout this. It's a very French orientated and Arthur is from Paris,that's where he was born, and it was basically a nap that serviced thebakeries in France. Writing. You know various social media related marketingsupport for bakeries and small businesses in France, you'll hear thatstory and how they grew: That company a lot of manual daughter door knocking toget customers with that, one which then eventually led to today's main topic,which is lambs the company that Arthur was co founder and still running over afigure business. Thousands of customers around the world they're not just doingmen's under, were there's woman's underwear, their shirts there's inCanada. They call it a tor ran astray. They call it a ben you put on your headso another way to protect yourself from radiation and that's the idea. It's allhealth conscious clothing, to protect you from the elements, not just thewell weather elements, but the radiation coming from all the technicaldevices we have around us all the time. I think you'll, like this interview,especially if you're looking to create a physical product and basically inventsomething new, which is what Arthur had to do. He'll share the story of how hecame up with the idea and how he manufactured the very first version ofhis product. So that will be interesting if you want to do somethingsimilar so make sure you stay tuned for that. So before I press play on theconversation, I had with Arthur a reminder that this episode is broughtto you by in box time. The company that Arthur booked in for a discovery callthat eventually led to this podcast being recorded in the first place inbox. Don is a company that provides virtual executive assistance to takeover your email, doing replies to your messages, organizing your email,managing email, your calendar, booking and scheduling. So all theconversations around bookings and meetings and gathering information andmaking sure the timing is right. Basic Admins, if you have anything to do withcustomer service data entry, any kind of software updates communicating withthe rest of your team. Basically what you would expect an executive assistantto do, but is especially qualified with superior communication skills, which wefind is necessary to handle something as personal and private as important asemail, which is definitely the specialization of in box done. So ifyou're, drowning and email messages. If you want someone to take over managingyour calendar- and you just need that right hand, person to kind of clone youin box done is the service for you. You can go to Inbox Tocol book. A discoverycall tell us about your needs: What kind of business you're in and then wecan begin the process to match you with two of our assistance, who you thenwork with them directly they're dedicated to you and they become partof your team and basically to go to work, to simplify and make your life awhole lot easier and free. You up get you at least a couple of hours backeach day, that's in box done com. Okay, let's begin today's episode, Hello, Arthur! Thank you so much forjoining me today, yeah. It's a pleasure to be here so a little bit ofserendipity how this podcast came together. I did not expect to a met youthrough the way we met that. I was also...

...surprised to find out that we had aconnection in the past. You had read my blog, and perhaps you were surprised toknow that I had purchased some of your underwear from your company and getlambs or lambs as it's known, which, for those who don't know lamps is acompany that provides so, at least when I put my underwear was just under. Werethat protects you from the to the WIFI signals, the phone signals all theradiation going around? I remember when I was looking at the. I think it was afacebook ad. I must have seen for your company at the time. Maybe Instagram,I'm not sure where I came across it, but you're probably were ever go, andthis is a years ago- and I remember going this- makes a lot of sense,creating clothing that blocks, what our laptops and our phones and ourcomputers are missing. Appeal to me, I've always in one of those people thatwas you know. I didn't like to put my phone on my back pocket, a hundredpercent of the time like I put it on an airplane mode. Whenever I'm putting itnear my body, you know that sort of daily habit I'm. So I love to hear thethe story of how you came up with this idea and how do you even buildunderwear their blocks radiation like that? You are the CO founder and CEO ofLamb, so we can talk about that. Would love to dive into your background aswell, but just for a kind of a summary of where lambs is that today? Do youwant to talk a little bit about? You Know How successful the company is yeahsure so lens is actually the first kind of company of its kind of the world,which is health and ENCINA apparel, so we've design, lamps and all of itsproducts with one thing in mind, which is how can we help our customers ontheir health and loss journey to be healthier without having to changetheir habits, so we started off with wires radiation, then added a fewthings or t shirts are up fifty, which means that they block ninety eight.Ninety H, plus percent of move, raise as well so really trying to remove asmany exle tresses as possible from the body. It's a nate four company. We havetens of thousands of clients here in the US, but also all around the world.I don't know if you were in Canada, where you bought our still in Australia.I was probly in Australia when I bought them for roaming around your aby. Maybea no, I was somewhere around the world yeah and it's growing ready, ready fast,which is awesome and it's it's a pretty amazing johnny and just to go back toyour intro of a certain pity. I was listening to this very bad cast almostten years ago, when I had my first job actually, so I was driving an hourevery day to get to work and our to get back and just listening to the amazingstories of people on the on your podcast. So it's pretty awesome for meto be able to show mine here yeah. I know I'm cited to show you a story andI love hearing from a long term listener. Ten years ago is a long timeago. I feel like there's a bit of a French Internet marketing kind of Mafia.Almost I don't know if you're a part of it, but I know I have a friend AlexySantin. He was person who came from France to Australia. I met him and thenthrough him I ve there's another person on my show called Aurelian Amerce whocreated system dot io. He was a guest on the show and then Olivia Roland wasInternet marketer I connected with many many years ago. I had him on the showas well, and I felt like every time I spoke to a French person who's doingsomething online. They all knew each other. So it is. I don't know what youknow if you, if you, when you left France, but is that kind of true, isthat sort of a strong community of entrepreneurs on Lin entrepreneurs inFrance yeah. So I met Odventer Sebastian, which is an another one ofthese famous marters in France a few yearsago before leaving France, I think they did a great job at creating a verystrong community and helping each other out and yeah. I think they did a greatjob at trying to educate the market. A little bit like you did like in twothousand and when you do so thousand and five something like this, they wereobviously Frances will behind in everything, and so it's I think, yeaharound two thousand and eight two thousand and nine is when it wit iswhen these guys get started and and started to try and help the Glincommunities lunching their own courses and products yeah. They have definitelyvery strong ties together and were you exposed to any of that back then orlike? was there any connection to it or a little bit? I mean I followed theirmaterial early on, but then I quickly moved to actually the the originalsource so more like the English peaking American marters. So the Americans, inthe wold, mostly you to be honest, consumed a lot of your materials butyeah you. Who else was I following back then Batlen was a big influence as welland and year, PASSO: Okay! Well, let's continue this dive in dear history soborn and raised in France, I'm assuming Bonan raise in Paris, Paris, okay,parents, any entrepreneurial influence there from your parents, or so it'smore when I grew up so apparently goding to my parents, when every kid isgoing to tell you that they want to be a policeman or a fire fighter or anastronaut or something like this. All I had was ideas for Businesseso. Most ofthem were probably not great but...

...growing up. I knew that I wanted tobuild something, and this idea of innovation and building something fromthe ground up was very ingrained in, as I was growing up, my grandfather was anentrepreneur and that might have come from him, but both of my parents neverstudied any company but were very enthusiastic at the idea of me tryingto to build something into not necessarily for it o steps up, Poetriaand litrator only so they were very spolit form from the Y early age. Doesthat mean you had some kind of business as a teenager or you planning on youknow studying business first? No, I definitely did a bunch of things when Iwas a kid. What did I do? I was building websites.I had a whole little ad thing running that was funding my whatever I neededto purchase when I was a kid so probably started this when I was ten totwelve and throughout, like middle school and high school, I was, I was running ads on a bunch ofwebsites that I had designed and built. Definitely nothing that I'm proud oftoday in terms of what I what I was out there, it was mostly about. I can'tremember what like video games and a bunch of different things, and that wasgoing of my first dabble into building stuff back then not rebuilt, not reallybuild for money to be perfectly transparent, like it was mostly morelike if I was passionate about something I'd, build the website in acommunity around it and then put ads on top of it and that's going to, butnever try to optimize or or really make money of any sort. With this like fromthe bucket money that was making. So I got a late start in the real business.Well, so in terms of your your kind of studies, then, if you were obviouslyaware of the Internet, you knew how to build websites, so that already is askill set. That gives you an advantage. What was the path fee? Did you go touniversity and study something related to business, or did you do something ogo straight into the work force or what was the path yeah? No, I definitely definitelystudied so I was I've kind of always followed mybastions in life. To be honest- and I was super interesting to things numberone. I knew I wanted to be an Trefren, and I knew I want to do a businesscomponent to what I was studying and to have always been fascinated with yourman, health, so very early on aside from from building businesses orinnovation. What have you? The other thing that I was super interested inwas how can we opto myself and pretty early on, have been exposed to peopledeveloping cancers and friends or family dying from second hand, smoking,and that really had an impact on me on realizing that what the choices that Iwas making today, I didn't had an impact on, on my likelihood to be sickto morrow, and I started getting myself in this basin, so I ended up doing twomessers degrees, one messer degrees in engineering and biology. We have aspecific focus on human health and biotechnology es and then completedthis with an NBA shortly after to go a little bit deeper and in thebusiness on the business side. How much do you, how much of your meador use inreal world? No not a lot but but therefore open up a lot ofdoors and and make great friends in great connections there, and a few ofmy Veddie went, went on to create amazing companies which I'm reallylooking up to go, so that was probably the best put no great. So you finish anMBA. What do you do next? Like is that a case of all I'm going to be anacademic I'll, just you know, try and get work in a university or I'll go. DoResearch like what were you thinking at the time? I also did it mostly becauseI knew it would really help in my entrepreneurial journey afterwards, sothis NBA was actually I majored in entrepreneurship, which is a weirdmajor per se, but the the way the program was designed was really designed in in a way that would going to help usbuild our first company which that school, which is what I did, exceptthat he was my second company. So I studied my first real business when Iwas twenty during my first message degree and then my second one was, Iwas wise. I was at school during Mamie, so I can not have a habit of startingschool and studying and business at the same time. Okay, how did those twobusinesses go in and what were they so? The very first one I'll go a little bitback in time for this one I started flowing cited when I was a kid lookinginto personal development. Pretty fascinated about this whole world of bettering myself and trying to be on ajourney of you know just improvement and stumble upon one book which areprobably very familiar with, which is the four swork week Biting Ferris andthis book at a massive impact on me...

...when I was eighteen nineteen a time inhow I looked at the world and that's what propelled me to actually start myvery first business- and I remember, reading this book like okay. Well, whatshould you lunch if you're like, if you you're looking for a business idea andI'm like yeah, I was nineteen years old back then or twenty and and I had noexperience in life except you know like the tration l rational stuff, but forone thing, which is in France, if you want to get into the AV schools, youhave to do the equivalent of the sats in the US, after two years of veryintense studies and it's completed to exam and based on your ranking, you getinto the best schools. So it's two years of your life that you're studyingwhere you're studying super hard core and- and you have this one exam- thatkind of determines the rest of your life from a academic perspective. Solets of pressure and back then. So I just completed that rang very well.Fortunately- and I was tutoring kids to for specially math and biology- and Irealized that all of my time that I was spending to during those kids was spentmostly teaching them about how to work rather than how to mass or to do mathor or anything like this, and that kind of got me going on well, I shouldprobably create a course that teaches students how to work more efficiently, which is the which was the mostimportant part, is not that you have so much to learn and to and to do that, ifyou're, not organizing yourself properly you're setting yourself up forfailure and and for Bon Ousche so created this for a scores, side sellingit and then realized quickly that it was not be on the right way. Trashedeverything follow your Lubra back, then kind of rebuild everything from theground up and yeah spend the next two or three years re just exploring withthis. So that's how I learned online ads that sorry, man, how to write copyproperly automation systems, side, the whole a war bird. I probably use yourFA Linch d to Get this started. I had whole yeah Weber sequence with upcells with with all this, so it was. It was an amazing first experience studenton about on and marketing, but not that's changed since then, but yeah andat Tuesday's Day the business is still going. It's it's fully automated, nottouching anything yeah. So that was my first experience with with onlinemarketing, and that was going to the only thing I knew back then was okay.Well, I've studied hard for two years and I can teach other kids how to dothis, and I think, with this I helped somewhere around ten thousand students.I don't have the latest numbers because is that I haven't touched that in in acouple of years, but that was a that was a great first aventure into intothis. Well yeah, it sounds so good he. Why did you stop or even stop it? Youlet it go in automatic mode, but did you just want to try somethingdifferent, so you just let that run itself and and start on thing new. So Iwas always wanted to do something a little bigger as well, so the biggestlimitation for this was the market size, which is they are about the there,forty or eighty thousand students that go this route every year, which isquite a lot of students, but at the same time that's kind of the marketrotation and it's a tough business in the sense that you spend a lot of timetrying to acquire a customer which is in your pool for two years, two tothree years and then their gun and they're signing their life atuniversity, and you don't have anything else to sellthem. So you have a very short period of time where your customers actuallypotential, where your prospects are actual prospects and then they're goneforever, and even your customers once you acquire them. I didn't have any blafterwards, like once you're in university, what you're in your in sothat was really the biggest imitation of the business when games when it cameto growth and then there is a reality behind it, which is after a few years.I was not really passionate about thisanymore. Mostly like this was another part of my life that you know like, Iwas not a student any more like. I was not a student of this busye cold playout. I was not a papa student any more and I had not been for a few years, andso at some stage it just became something that I'm not sure I couldreally build the best, the best products out there anymore, because Iwasn't. I wasn't part of the of this Wilton for quite a one. Okay, it makessense it's a common story. I think I've had the same idea where I'm like. Iwant to do something bigger, I'm no longer interested in this industry, butyou were still studying when you started your second one. So what wasthe idea for that one? So the second one was a b tbe Company, so I realizedI realized. I contray remember the the...

...full like a hot moments for this one,but I think it was actually a marketing class where we were starting to look at social need, J specifically and how bigcompanies are using social media to create a stronger connection with theirclients and just awareness with them at all times. In France, you have a bunchof small businesses, especially in the food and beverage industry. So you havea lot of bakeries. Specifically, you have a lot of meat shops, you have a lot of flowershops, etc. So lots of small businesses that are are struggling to face the big.You know the war mots of the world in France and back then start going andchatting with with those guys and realized that they had a whole at allof them had heard about social media. All of them were super interested incommunicating with their clients there, letting them know about the behind thescenes of how do you make it by get of the products coming for holidays, etc,et Cera, yet none of them knew how to use it or if they did, they definitelydidn't. Have time because they are already so busy running the whole shopand making the products and everything that goes with it, and so the secondcompany that I built was in that Solinghi. We were trying to help smallbusinesses to gain visibility with social media without having to put inas much work and making it super simple for them. So we built a whole APP forfor this market so that they could use it very, very simply andbe through a guided journey. Be Able to spend ten minutes and plan out the nextcouple weeks in terms of posts with the kind of post that they needed to createexplained and the whole thing super guided. So I'd be able this with mybrother and our main Atatitenron was our grandmother essentially we're likeokay, she doesn't know anything was a phone as he is the into that and we'regoing and we're having her try the F and kind of twicked it till she couldactually use it and she was like okay. I understand that's easy there, allright. We get it neil down and yeah, and then I first got somerswhere bakeries we started going to door to doors, to bakeries, trying to sellthem the software. We build this on assass model, which has always been myfavorite models of all times where you acquire a customer once and hopefully,if you do your job well this day for ever, and I believe that our very firstcustomer is still with us today, which is kind of cool wow. So what's the nameof this business, this is one P one out. Okay, so that's that's. If I'm lookingout here, your profile Linkedin, that's the other. Besides lambs. Obviouslyyour current business, one APP is still your present company or like a boardmember so and method, prepar s, I s, you arestillicide there as a founder to so it sounds like you build a business, youdon't you know, shut it down or sell it use you. Let one continue to runautomatically what happened with one apt. Did it grow to the point where youcould retire young and rich like? How did that go? I don't think I'm ever going to retire. This is my idea of retirement is to dowhat I love to do and if that's what it is, then I've been retired. My wholelife in a sense a good way. I'm putting it agree, I thot, but how well did ithave did one epcot. I was still going now, seven years later, so what's thegrowth story there yeah, so it went very well. Actually. I was buildingthis on the side during my Ba and I think we grew the team to go to tenpeople very very quickly and we grew to a point where what it becamewas okay. Well, we either need to go after other markets internationally orwe we need to figure out like a different bath for a company to getpaste diceing of just the nature of the market. Is that because you ran abakeries or you just ran out of every type of business? Small Business inFrance is a lot of I never endite. No for sure for sure we were. We are focusing on bigger cities,mostly and just jutant, that the business limitation was that with thistype of of businesses, it's a lot of personal relationship that you need todevelop. So they are very happy to use your product, but they want to meet youin person. First, they want you to go and train them and explain them how itworks, and so the limitation that we grew into is okay. Well, we can only doif that's how it's going to work. We come to cities that are like three fourfive hours away, and we need to make sure that in one given day, when we'regoing out to meet these people...

...prospect our clients that were able tooptimize the day, so that can limit it very quickly where we could go and andhow we could grow there, and so the business still grew to do. We were doing six figures essentially,but based on this, that was kind of the DIMITTI mass. Do how big we could growit and you didn't want to like get a sales team to kind of go door to doorand just you know, pay them on to a we like that. This is Otso. This is whatwe grew originally and but again, like the challenge was we could only have acell team in areas where it made sense to have where we had enough bakeriesenough clients to really make it work. Otherwise the commission would be Imean just from a economic perspective. You still need to pay people minimumwages and friends, even if they are a self steam and just based on minimumwage is bless, go mission, etc. It only made sense in big cities and that thisis what we did. So we built it to this point and and now we're thinking, okay,well, we've kind of saturated the big cities in France. Do we go to othercountries like how? How do we run this, and at this stage I am also at pointwhere I want something that, like the idea that I had for my career, was Iwanted to lunch, a business where I could impact millions of people, and sothe bet to be Sass was awesome from business perspective and from anexperience, experience perspective. But I was like I I would love to go and dosomething that really where I can really impact a lot more people, andthis is the discussion that I had done with my brother, which was like okay.Well, I'm. This is awesome what we built, but I I don't want to continueon building this abroad, because because honestly, I just want to achange of scenery. So he took the reins to business and he's a little bityounger than I am so. He was pretty happy not to have me in his hair togrow this and that that worked out pretty well, and so he took the reins.I stayed on just to help out with this rage and I went on to create lamps.That was that was the moment where I was likeokay. Well, if I'm for the next one, I want something kind, O learn from thetwo businesses and I was like okay. I want something where I've got a hugemarket size and I want something where I'm really fascinate about what I'mfeeling so that in a few years from now, I don't have this feeling of like well,I'm not a student any more, therefore, like I'm not connected to my market,and so that's the that's how I knew that lamas the right fit when I when Iwhen I started it, because I was like okay, I can be in there for ten years.That's that's my like twenty years. It's all good! No, no pun intendedthere with the right fit interesting. Evolution. You've got so you were aneducation marketer and I can see why connecting with my work and Pat Flynnwould lead you down that kind of path, then an APP which is little more trickybecause it's software and then you're doing like dotard or sales, which isyou know, different from selling a digital information product. You knowwith email, marketing and so on, and then now you say I'm going to dosomething completely different physical. I mean not completely different becauseit is online, but you are selling a physical item. How do you begin thatkind of business like did you have any understanding of like how do youmanufacture under were plus the added aspect of this and I'd love to know tohow you even came up with the technology for that that lambs idea inthe first place yeah? So I can watch his for how the idea came about first.So again, aside from entrepreneurship, one of my big thing was health up tomusician. So I was reading countless books on the topic I studied humanbiology, etc, etc. So one thing that I realize when they as we are having sowe're, have in dinner with friends and all of us take their cellphones out oft e of our pockets and we all put in table face down and that prompted thediscussion which was okay. Well, we've all heard about the fact that weprobably shouldn't put out Celton in our pockets. Next to our next to ourreproductive organs, and yet we're all doing this on a daily basis, and so this was the moment where was likethat's interesting, so we were I'm pretty health conscious. Most of myfriends are we're watching what we're eating we're watching, what we'reputting inside up bodies, but we're not really watching what we're exposing ourbodies to and what kind of external stresses is there out there and how badare they and so looked into wise radiation specifically realize thatit's a class to be Human Casino Gen, which is the same as car exhaust toms,a goring to the World Health Organization, and that was the a momentwhere I was like. Okay, if there was a...

...car running in my bedroom or my livingroom at all times, I'm probably not be staying there, and this is effectivelywhat I'm doing with were less radiation, except that it can't smell it in thespecific case. But it's it is impacting my my body and so that's what promptedme to stop wicking to can we re? Can we create something that solves thisproblem and that helps us? Essentially, monitor what we're exposing our bodiesto look into solutions, that's already existed and it turns out that NASAspace suits have a built in radit proof technology, because astronauts in spacelike exposed to a ton of cosmic radiations. I one of my friend one ofmy good friend is an credible engineer. He's got a ton of patterns under hisbelt and he really has this beautiful mind of creating solutions. Wheneverproblems exist. So we sat down, we went through hiscreative process of how can we use the same principle, the same technology butadapt it for for governments, and I argomenti the best thing it tens thatthat it is and how can we? How can we adapt it so spent quite a bit of time,but then he was completing his PhD. We had access to lab and yeah just gotstarted with iterations of of a fabric to try and create somethingthat would actually block quid. I ration, I didn't know anything aboutcreating a physical product. Our very first product was terrible, absolutely terrible, but what I didknow was how to have to sell something on the Internet, and so he was focusedon building the product and he's not part of the company. He has a. He has ashare of the company he's someone who doesn't want to opar it to business, sohe loves to create technologies et Cetera, but he he's more of a he's.Definitely an inventor for sure. So e on you don't acquitting the company forfor creating the technology, but as he's as is derating on on version goproduct, I'm trying to figure out okay, how I'm going to sell this thing online,and how can I get this off the ground with a dusting market and be spending?I mean? How do I optimize my spending essentially so back then kick totterhad been a thing for for a few years now, so I looked into a qui crowd.Fending spent about six months to create our first campaign and that'show we get started. We just did a very. We did a Compagni with zero marketingbudgets, essentially letting our friends and family know and from theirworld of mouth word of mouth grew, and it grew enough to for us to start offas badge of product manufactured in a proper factory and, as I said, prettypretty terrible product at the beginning, because we didn't knowanything about how to MC Doman's, but you know, got is going and and we got,we gathered feedback and we grew the business. Essentially with this initialinput of money, which was our first cratering an IT, was pretty small likeit was twenty twenty five thousand dollar something like this, but thatwas enough to get us going to get a firstrate batch start selling the proget more get more money in the bank and kind ofget the bold running like this. That was men's under, were so it's kind ofscratching, my own itch in a sense, and so so yeah. That's how we got that's,how we funded the company and then fast forward. A few months later, there's anevent here in the US called CS. The consumer Electran show the massiveevent where companies go and present their latest inventions and novationsin the technology world for consumers, and so we back, then our NE product isunderwear. We reach out to the CS. They have a special start up program whereyou can go there, for I think it's like a thousand dollars for for a booth.It's it's nothing that they have to select you. They love the idea and andthe the God us a booth in their in their startup pavilion and we went there and we're like okay,we're literally spending all of our money going to Las Vegas to thisconsumer. Drink show back then we're based out of friends. There are flights,there are all the cuss associated with conference. Hotels Etcetra wereliterally spending our entire budget on this, but we're like this is the oneplace where, if anything, we should pick up a lot of traction and we willhave people become a word or were at what we're doing so it's at one shotand we don't want to miss it. So we brain some on. How can we get maximumexposure and the way we did it was we went there? We had t shots on whichexplained what we were doing and no pens, so we walked around this conference. Essentially, it's really an ornee got a ton ofattention and it was pretty awesome, so we had like a ton of Canalis. Iremember this journalist. I think she...

...was from the ABC News or somethingshe's on her way to some interview. She sees us. She turns around with a greatmar cruse she's, like no we're going this way kind of paid off to to play on this,because we ended up being the number one start up in terms of exposure thatyear they had like the c this s at this tool, that was money, taring theInternet for key words and and the name of the company just get bumping upeverywhere. I have a question. Actually I ther im two questions, but I got toask one now lambs: Where did the name come from in the first place? Yeah?Originally we started company with a different name and the number one question that wewere getting from our customers, given the fact that it is health announcing apro that is protective and it's made out of silver fibers. I M not sure ifyou can see properly in the camera, but the very first question that we'regetting was: is that comfortable or is it going to be like a chain mail typeof garment? Because you know and and we talk out, we took a lot of time tryingto figure out like how to create something that be as comfortable, ifnot more comfortable than than a tration government. And so we decidedto Renan the company with a name that would that would really feel that theywould really scream comfort and so lambs. There was this idea of like codeof wool, of a lamb that is a very protective but soft and and completewhat was the first name of the company. The original the first name was parter.The first time was Patenson Spartan. Okay. So when can I e other waycompletely in terms of in terms of naming and also les was I mean? Theidea for the company was apt say to go broader and spotte originally was tokind of appeal to manliness, which doesn't really work for women, and wedo have a woman line today. So yeah yeah makes sense. Okay, all right soback to the CES story, you're the number one start up in terms ofexposure at this event, but what does that actually mean for a business,because it sounds like you spent your twenty five grand kickstarter money,which was meant to I assume, go to manufacture the first batch to thensend to all those backers as well. So does that CES exposure lead to moreinvestors or retailers buying your product or like how does it plan yea?So we had already manufactured the product. We had already sent theproducts to our backers back then. We also had some seed money that we hadput in into the company ourselves and so that that's actually what we spentmostly. So we had products we had products. We had inventory we'd already,did EVADNA kick Stoller, so what I did is one cells, so we sold out of all of our currentinventory, which was great and and had got some cash for in the company and toas you said, that allowed us to go out to investors now with something more.So when creating something with the I mean, our end goal is to become thenumber one was in brand in the world for us, health, conscious people sodefinitely a very, very big vision, and so we realize quickly that we're goingto need help and we're going to need that exol investors. If we want to growthe business, the challenge you have when you're a kid I mean I had beable acouple of businesses, but on this one. Essentially, we had a side from theproduct and this first campaign we didn't have any anything to really showto investors, and this was really helpful in the sense that yes, this isinteresting like this is speaking up interest in the world, but also- andmostly it's like- we can get stuff done like you- can trust us as a team and by them.It's me and Michael Founder, so we were two people, but it's like yeah,we'll get under where we'll get wewe got brand juice and- and we can showyou what we did so far, and that was very helpful in convincing people tothat. We were the right team to take this forward and to grow this and andthat's how we we were able to commute so first investors. Okay, so twoquestions on that. How did you you meet your co founder and like what otherskill sets, because this is not a software startup? So to speak? You knowit's a it's a D, TC directo consumer product. I understand the need for theinventor but, like you said he didn't continue on as an active founder. Iknow your skill Arthur you're, the marketing guy, so I get what you bringthe table, you would have been, you know, ready to put out all the ads anddo the so and whenever you can to growth hack this company. What was yourco founder needed for yeah corporations mostly and someone who I wasessentially looking for someone who had a very different personality from me,so I'm very creative. I can I come up...

...with different strages. I like I, canbe a vision for the future and I need someone who is very, very regular, verytalented at taking something and operating essentially, and I met my cofounders through online ads. I put on that for someone and it wasinteresting because the I essentially wanted to recruit someone back then I Imean I have a lot of friends that would fit the bill, but they were all working on something atthe time. The natural thing that came for me was like okay. Well, I'm goingto recruit someone probably the most unappealing ad, which essentially Isaid well, you need to invest money to get into the business, because I wantedsomeone who was serious about it. Not You know like Oh, that soundsinteresting, so my co, founder Thomas, was the last applicant out of probablyI had two hundred people who replied to the said: Where did you put the ad thislike as a job on Linkedin or traitin on shop as okay? Yeah is essentiallysomething like indeed yeah had about two hundred applicants. Thomas was thevery last one to apply because after two hundred I was like I need to shutthis off like this is got the friends folk funcal with him, as I'm writing abicycle to go meet to one of the applicants actually and during thisphone call. I'm like there's something about this guy like he seems to beSuper Smart, and so I be able to process to kind of go through skillsets. I'm a big big fan of having people do something instead of justinterviewing them and Thomas's case study was was was ready stellar. Whatwas interesting as well as again, like I said, like I, was asking him toinvest money to by equity into the business, so that I know I knew youwould be serious about it. He had just had his first kid back then as well andand yeah, and there is this guy who, just at his first care, was like I'mgoing to quit my job, I'm going to invest money and I'm going to get thisup the ground with you, who's super smart who just did a Stiller C studyand yeah. We're super well paired and we've been working right together sincethen, and he has to look good and underwear if you're going to walkaround the trade show floor during Odeaka. So then you decide to raise somefunding and I can totally understand why it's a physical product. It's youhave to do that, dance! Where you, you sell a bunch, you get some cash, butyou have to use that cash to manufacture the next and so on. So howdo you raise money for this and what kind of valuation? And what are youlooking for during that? First race, because I'm assuming that was also thefirst time you ever raised money for your own star up at this level, I beenraising money stuff first off, so it's a it's a massivedance cause invested. It's a very interesting, it's very interestingexercise because it's all about social proof, essentially the first in Vestelthat you meet the potentially interested, but they want to see likeokay, do you have other investors and you I oh I'm talking with a bunch ofinterested people is like okay. Let me know when what's the update like asanyone invested yet so it's a it's a very interesting exercise where youlearn to. Essentially you need to find some this first person wis going tomake the decision and and yeah. So what happened is shortly after the CS. Weactually had a first investor who contacted us from my schools. I've gotsomeone who riches out and he's like hey my father. He is he's the CEO ofthis big, like fabric company and and he'd love, to talk to you because hethinks that's super interesting. We meet with that person. He wants to invest back then two or three hundred thousand dollarsinto the business, but he has one specific requirement, which is I wantto be the sole investor in the business. I don't want any CO investors and andthat's it and back then, when you're just getting started like getting, andthe incision of Gash of three hundred does and sounds like well. This isabsolutely awesome and I'm chatting with the partner of a VC fund. Whoessentially was she was she's super bright as well. I really admire her andshe was. She essentially walked me thor the numbers and she was like, if you'retaking this money right now as a soul investor, there is no way that you'regoing to be able to grow the company to a point where either you don't need anymoney anymore or you can raise more capital, because this is just notenough to get you to your next stage. Can I walk me through this? I realizethat whether thanks to her went back to that guy started. Talking about well actuallylike here is how much it's going to take like hers. You ve dated businessmodel and if you want to be the sole investor, that's fine, but then youneed to put in twice as much or William need other investors. He went on to tryand find a cup get of us, which was which was pretty funny. We havepatterns, we have patent protection on on or technology, but that neverstopped anyone, and so we had a cup get...

...that started a few months later that hefunded. That was the very first guy that we discussed with so the copy cattoday is dead, and so that's so at least I mean on this and that didn't really work outfor him, but we went on to find amazing investors looking mostly for smartmoney at the beginning, I mean actually we've always done that and trying tofind people in the space. So our investors were all coming either fromthe health and wellness world or from the apparel world, and this was reallyinstrumental for us so later on. We today have the formerpresident of Lee Lemon was an investor and adviser to the company, and we havequite a few people who are in India paral space as well, and that reallyhelped us feel the product that was much better than the original one wherewe're like. Well, we don't know what we're doing so when you we knew how to sell products online. Weknew how to create this technology, but we didn't know anything about makinggovernments about logistics about all this. So yeah we did this dance. Weconvinced the first person to write us. A first check was seven point: Fivethousand dollars you know like, but actually said, God got the Bull Rollingand then we got a ten thousand dollar shake, and then we got a twenty sandorcheck and and slowly bit trolly. We were able to put together around andand raise office from equity, which was which was crison backs and and whichwas got topped off by a little bit of going met money as well. We got a grantfor four hundred K. So how have you managed to grow to the point? You aretoday like what's what's worked well for you well, first off what of mouthso forest. That's always been the biggest biggest channel, we've reallyfocused early on on trying to figure out. If we had primark et fit, which isdo people do people repurchase our products and especially with somethingliknes. It's a decision that you're making which is okay. Well, I careabout my health and I care about this, and I want to take this step of likewearing health and ancing a pro wearing something that protects me from ariparata from U Ector when you're making that choice. In theory, youshould be making that choice for every day of the week, not like. Oh I'm goingto buy one and that's it so very interesting aspect for us was likemonitoring. Okay, people repurchasing the product, and so we spend a lot oftime at the beginning, working on a product to make it good enough thatpeople would want to actually switch out two lambs fully and and then thesecond pieces were touching, something that is a very important value forpeople, health and so as much as I don't really share which sucks I'mwearing. As I don't really care enough like something that I do for my health,I'm going to share with the people that are important and Clistin, and sothat's something that we really tried early on to to make work for us, whichwas okay, can fat people going to be telling diference and family aboutlambs? So that was the very first one was okay. Let's make sure that we havea product that people want to talk about and then and then the secondpiece was on an online as which is probably how you found this, and thiswas a skill said that I learned to develop back in my metaled days, whichtoday is sercial different landscape. When I was a few years ago where youcould go in and you had potable ads super asily and what not for us it was,it was not like this at the beginning, so we had to kind of learn how this haddwelled in in recent years- and I would say the biggest difference is- are veryearly on. Our first employee is someone that I actually met. whils travelingthe world. I did a one year stint where I went around the world before studying.Lambs actually met this guy. Who is the smartest engineer, I've ever met and who joined the company is over firstemployee and what was an instrumental for us is having someone technical onboard from the Gito so that we could eater it very quickly on a website andget precise data so compared to any starting business. We had a ton moredata and we had the ability to go and iterate without you know: spending tensof thousands of l on a free answer for every website edit, and we were focusedon one thing when looking at online ads, which, like okay, the end of thefederal, is going to be a website. So how do we make sure that the website isas clear as possible and converts, and so we went on to increase our corvesierrate threefold before we actually really spent money on online ads, andwe did this by baby testing all the time sending minimal traffic, butmonitoring everything. Doing a lot of focus groups with people and like isthis clear: Do you understand what we're doing exter, etcetera and throughthis we were able to o first find tune,...

...the end of the funnel and then finallysent people over to the website once we knew that we had something that wasfree stall, clear that was converting Eric are and to this date we keep oniterating just much the new profession of the website recently, which isperforming even better than the Oger one. This is something that is veryingrained into which we're doing just constant, constant experiments, butyeah. If I had to pointing down to one like a success to one factor, was likevery very early on focusing on these new or metrics, which was okay. ArePeople getting what we're doing well yeah, that's very smart for such anearly phase. Normally people do that later on. I think to really start atthe beginning. If people want to see the website obviously get Lambson, Icould go see your your most recent version. Like you just said the newversion. I know we got to kind of start wrapping up my fault. I have to runthis time. I thor what is a day in the life like for you now, because I know.Obviously you were the CO founder with just your one. Co Founder, you were theone at the Avanti with the one wearing the product. You were the one, probablywriting the copy running the ads. Now it's a like. You said an a figure.Business you've got thousands of customers, I'm guessing you don't dothe same roles as you did back then. So what Adain the life for you with theBusiness Yeah? It is very different from what I was doing back then. We nowhave a team so which are taking care of various suspects of the company. Ispent most of my time doing three things: one working with my team makingsure that we're working over on the right stuff that it's going in theright direction and they're, amazing and and the company would not beanywhere close to where we're at today without their hard work. So you knowjust making sure that they're distat motivated that and that this is goingthe right way, so management and leadership, if you will to is I spend alot of time exchanging with our customers actually by email or tryingto get on the phone with them as aften as I can, but we're an online businessand control to retail, where you have someone or service, where you'redirectly working with your clients. In our case, we don't see them unless weactively try to reach out to them, which is what we do, and that allows meto better understand our audience. I era, and that goes on to the third part,which is the strage so constantly working on. Where are we going? How canwe get there more efficiently? Speaking with all those seals in the space andrebuilding this network? Speaking with our investors, speaking with as manypeople as I can to better understand of space, better understand our clientsand keep on building the division for next month's next quarter next year,next, five years, ixora yeah, it's amazing, it's it's a super. One thingthat was fascinating in this journey was the moment where you transitionfrom running your own business, where it's you to actually having employeesand people who I entire families that the business is able to support, and-and that's the moment where you're like well, we built something that is theIsrael and that doesn't need necessarily me anymore either, which iswhich is a pretty pretty insane feeling like having a child and then watchingthem grow up. It's Ly Yeah and then watching them have children and nowthat's a thing yeah. I'm a lot of my friends todayhave bield companies where they don't know all the employees anymore. I'm notlet at that phase yet where we don't know each other, but this is I, likethe Chilano for sure and you're in San Francisco right now we're in SantaMonica, so Los Angeles, yeah, there's a huge health in Rome scene here in a ina biggie commerce community as well. So it's makes a lot more sense than SanFrancisco, which is very software focus. Yes, okay! That of course, all rightall right! Thank you for the story. I feel like I love to dive into your adstrategies and I love to dive into you know all the steps in the investing aswell a bit more, so there's so many layers to all this success. Maybe wecan come back and do like a round to when you get to the next stage and intwelve months or something like that, I would be on or to okay, let's, let'sput it in the calendar website, so obviously get Lambo for buying theproduct. I know when I shopped it was underwear for men. I remember seeingbeanies or Torques, as they call him here in Canada, for your head pop upwoman's underwear, you're wearing a t shirt, so there's clothing apparel. Yousaid this is going to be for healthward for anyone, who's, health, conscious ora clothing for thim was health conscious. I'm resuming socks underwears shorts pans, Yoga gear active where everything in anything willeventually will be available and get lambs. Is that about right? Yeah? Wehave a lot of products in development. It takes a lot of time to developproducts because again, like we're really focused on making something onmaking products out tree exceptional in that people want to share. But we havea bunch of products in India eleven ent. So if you don't find what you, whatyou're looking for, I feel free to sign up to our meaningless and you'll,probably get it at some stage in other was I should me an email at art and getMC. That's how I extensile El lit a...

...simmer so feel fit to just shoot me anote and yeah I'll be happy to hear from art at get lambo fantastic or getLampo and look up the contact info arther. Thank you for for taking thetime and keep up the great work. I love to see Lambs one day, maybe IPO. Thatwould be fun thing to see. So yeah go thanks, your amazing being on the show,really appreciate it and thanks everyone for listening all right. I hope you enjoyed thatinterview with Arthur Menard. I feel like there's going to be a part too.Very soon. Do not be surprised if you see on the feed of vested capital. Asecond interview with Arthur, I felt like I was a little rush for time. Ididn't get to ask a few of the questions I wanted to a hundred percent.My thought I had another engagement I had to run off to so I would have lovedto have done another extra half an hour, so I'm going to ask Arthur to do a partto and we can dive into a few things around lambs. I didn't get to ask andalso something he's got some investment strategies that I'd love to talk abouttoo, as a fellow angel investor. I never got a chance to ask him aboutthat. So, hopefully we'll have him on a part too, but you certainly got a greatold review of his life in this part one. I hope you enjoyed that, and especiallyif you're someone who has an idea for perhaps a new type of product- that'snot been done before. I think just hearing the inside into how Arthurconnected with an inventor how they got the product made like the firstprototype and then, of course, the fun story of how they went to theconvention ces in Vegas and promoted by wearing the underwear you walkingaround the convention, which led to a lot of exposure, a lot of new customers.That was a lot of fun to hear as well. If you have a family member or a friendwho would benefit from hearing this story from Arthur, perhaps they'relooking to create or invent a new product and build a business around it,send them to vested Capital Episode Twenty Nine to hear Arthur's story. Itwill possibly lead to a break through maybe an insight or, at the very least,inspire them to get started with their business, and you, too should subscribeto vested capital using whichever podcast playing APP. You currently use,whether it's apple or Google, or spotify, or Amazon or audible. All ofthose devices. All of those APPs have the ability to subscribe to a podcastthey'll have a plus button or a follow button or subscribe button. If youclick that, while you're listening domestic capital, you will get anotification than usually a download of every new episode. As I release it,plus it will unlock all the previous episodes where you can listen into somany amazing stories from other entrepreneurs and successful investorsin things like crypto stocks, property and so on. And, of course, if you arean apple user, I would really appreciate, if you hit the Review Bun,to leave your review within itunes for this podcast. That would really help meto rank hire in the rankings within apple and thus reach more people, and,of course, that leads to more great guests, more interviews for you, okay,going to wrap it up. My name is Yaro. Thanks for listening to today's episodeand I'll speak to you on the next one, by Bye.

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