Vested Capital
Vested Capital

Episode · 3 months ago

(VCM1): The Vested Capital Mastermind: Introducing Nick, Mani & Gideon

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Introducing a new experiment on the Vested Capital podcast - a group show with some of my best friends.

Meet Nick, Mani and Gideon. Three guys I've known for years who I speak to on a regular basis. 

Through our friendship we discuss all the topics that I cover here on Vested Capital, so I thought why not start a group show we can drop on the feed here once a month - or on whatever schedule we end up focusing on.

I'm a big fan of listening in to conversations with people who are doing interesting things. Nick, Mani and Gideon are running startups, investing in real estate and crypto, thinking about things like lifestyle design, balancing family with work, being productive, and of course, generating cash flow and investing to grow capital.

We don't yet have a name for this sub-show, so for now I'm calling it the Vested Capital Mastermind, since these guys have very much functioned like a mastermind group for me over the years.

In this first episode I asked each of the guys to introduce themselves and explain what they are currently working on. We also discuss topics like real estate investing, productivity (also being productive with a family) and resource allocation.

Note this is very much an experiment, so we do appreciate your feedback on whether you like this format. We've never done a four-way podcast before, so even just learning the flow and structure is going to take some time.

If you have any suggestions for a different name for the show, or topics we should discuss on future episodes, or would like to send through a question for us to address (in audio or text format), email it through to yaro@yaro.blog.

Of course this group show will not in any way replace my regular Vested Capital interviews, so it's still business as usual there.

Enjoy the conversation.

Yaro

Podcast: https://www.yaro.blog/pod/
Blog: https://www.yaro.blog/

Hey Hey, this is aro and welcome to alittle bit of an experimental podcast for you today. So this is not followingmy typical format for vested capital: I'm not interviewing a guest, I'mactually inviting three of my closest buddies on to talk about all the topicswe do normally cover on bestially capital, so investing startups business,making money and because two of my guys friends actually are fathers. We evenhave a bit of talking about family as well in this first trial, run of a showthat we don't have a name for you either. So we're still talking aboutwhat to call this, we're not sure how frequently we're going to do it, we'retalking about maybe making it a regular monthly thing. It's certainly somethingI've been excited to do for a long time, because my three friends, Gideon Nickand manny, who all introduced themselves with much more depth at thestart of this episode. If you don't know these three guys, that's fine, youwill hear a bit more about them at the beginning and I hope, over time, you'lllearn a lot more about them too, as they share they've all got amazingskills. I've known these guys for many many years I've been in business withthem. I've been in coaching client relationships with them, like certainlyspent many hours. Talking about all the usual things like start up challengeshow you invest your money, all the usual things like real estate, cryptocurrency stock market trading, pretty much anything that vest the capital asa podcast has covered. I have talked to these guys about at some point. So, nodoubt we will also cover these subjects as well, because this is an experiment.I really would appreciate your feedback, so send me an email and send me aquestion to these guys are really eager to help all of the listeners and we'dlove you to suggest any topics or ask any questions. You can do that bysending me an email Yaro at Yaro do blog or just head to my podcast homepage, my block home page you'll find links to contact me. There send us yourfeedback, and you can do that on social media. To leave a comment leave a reply.I leave a question. I will see all of those questions that you drop there andhopefully we can answer some of them on future episodes of this show, which I'mnot sure what the call yet we're still trying to figure out the name for this.It's a little bit like a master mind, so I like that term and I don'tnecessarily want to call it a master mind, but I've certainly have masterminded with all three of these guys before. So let me know what you thinkplease be patient with us to. This is an experiment for us as well. Theseguys aren't all regular podcast host, like myself so they're, getting a feelfor what it's like to talk on a show. They also don't all know each other foryears and years individually. I know them all for years and years, and theseguys are certainly aware of each other, but they also have to get used to theflow of a for way podcast, which is a challenge in itself, so we're going toget better. We appreciate your feedback, appreciate your questions and that's it.Let's get going with an introduction to my three good friends, Gideon and nickand Manny. Here we go all right here. I am with three of my closest friendsfrom the world of business, Internet marketing, Australia, America, guysI've known well, some of you for many many years at least a few years for allof them. So I'd love to introduce you to three of my closest buddies. I'vegot nick from nothing, many from a lots of things, but we're going to go. Savefocus blocks to io for today and get in from Asho, but you may also know get infor many many years working on some projects with me. If you're a long termfollower, I invited these guys on to the podcast. Is We're going to do atest run see if this is something we enjoy doing see if there's somethingthere's an audience for? We don't have much of an agenda, but I thought itobviously would make sense, first of all to introduce a little bit abouteach of these guys, what they're doing now and what they've done in the past.So, let's start there nick to nick from nothing. I love it. No I mean I don'thave, I suppose, a key personal project that I'm working on like the last tenyears of what I've been focused on, has been helping. Other people buildbusinesses and particularly sort of building start up companies here in thebay area. So I was sort of very lucky now, almost ten years ago, to join acompany called out any when it was series a and twenty people, and itreally had the opportunity to ride that...

...through to like a late stage, start updoing sort of a hundred million and revenue and my role- and that wasturning, I suppose, a very initial product into then leading a good chunkof product management. A couple o years ago now, I joined a company called sin,drive and sort of trying to repeat the story. So, like that's, like eightninety percent of my time right there and I think, sort of yea you and I wecatch up pretty regularly and chant about everything else that exists inthat ten twenty percent. For me, outside of of like nine to five, whichis a whole bunch of interesting stuff, it is funny we really talk about youractual job right, nakeds, mostly the the stuff you do on the side so which,just for the sake of clarity, what do you do on the side? What do you want tohighlight there? I know property is one thing we talk about yeah a lot of mylast six months or so has been really diving into the like the world ofproperty, investing and trying to understand. For me, it's like the longterm dream of being sort of financially independent and retired and sort ofwhat's the path to get that I've looked at, so many different avenues andproperty has been the one. I've been really trying to understand deeply thelast six months. I not from my time he's been great because the marketseems to be like blowing up and yeah like we catch up pretty regularly onlike crypto and really just I think years ago it would have been calledlike a lifestyle design. I think it's metter since then, but everything thatthat encompasses- and I remember yeah various different fitness programs andI'm sort of really pushing pretty hard on fitness right now. So that's alsocrewing up a pretty big chunk of time awesome and just for the side of theproper you ready, dived in have an you bought a police one property. I know ofright YEP, so it's like training, wheels and sort of dipping toes in andtrying to find a way to do it without sort of risking everything. I've got ayoung family. So that's now another dimension to try and optimize for, butthat's that's been really the last sort of six months or so was trying to wrapmy head around that space. Okay, I'm moving over Romany. What's thebackground, many all right! Well, I used to be a computer engineer, neverin Baria, though mostly in San, Diego and Austin, and I left all of the artto start two send books back in two thousand and fifteen two thousand booksas a book summary Portal. It's some reason of the world's best businessbooks and personal development books, mostly for entrepreneurs, and I've beenrunning that business for the last six years now and just recently, and as Iwas running the business, I got to read a ton of books in the process overfifteen hundred books at last counts, after which I stopped counting and whatwas fun for me. I was like I would go into these topics, one at a time deconstruct them trying to figure them out and one of the most pontivy. So Iread all of the greatest books on Productivity Time Management, executionhabits, collegeman rituals routines, anything I could think of. I justbasically. They are all of that and noting that I summarize those bookscreated summary Packs of those, and then I created multiple courses onprior activity on how to never procrastinate again is one of them anddouble your prior Tivity by five p m tomorrow, that's another one, so Icreated all these courses, but what I found over what I found myself was at cross roads earlierthis year, when I found my girlfriends fighting with me, because she felt likeI never had time for her, because I was working crazy hours all the time andwas working from six seven in the morning till seventy P M in the eveningwhen old come back from office, and then I would still be on my computer,my phone and things would just keep on going like that and she was like thisis not working. This is not the kind of life I this is not going to change.This is going to be the rest of your life. I can see this already so what'sgoing on and I was like you know, I think I am the King of productivity. I like, when I work my system, the systemI have designed it works, but then a lot of days I just don't work thesystem and hence I just fall off the wagon and I kept on thinking like howis it possible. I have probably more knowledge than Hunne NE NE POINT: Nine,nine, nine percent of the world out there when it comes to priority, but Istill can't you know I keep doing it...

...and then I fall off the wagon and do itand I fall up the wagon and I do it in a fall of the wagon and sometimes I doproductor very well. Sometimes they execute the system for a week,sometimes for a few days, sometimes for a month, but then I inevitably fall offthe wagon, so they're goin to be thinking like. Why is that? Why doesthat happen? And I realize every tool out there when it comes to Pronatti- isdependent on one thing, and that is the most fickle resource that we all have,which is your will power? Your self discipline, your motivation, right, youcan know all about productivity. You know you shouldn't. Have yourdistractions on when you need to do your best work. You know you should doyour most important work first thing in the morning. You know you should workin large chunks of one interpret time all of these things you know, but forsome reason most of us don't do them, because it's it requires a lot of willpower and motivation and discipline to do productivity every single hour. Thatway, no matter what predative Y simpsy, em more tool or book, I read everythingdependent on everything was depending on my will power I had to grit throughit. I had to work hard to make it happen. If I didn't it just don'thappen, and I was like okay, I need to outsource this need for will power andmortification and self discipline, because I just can't keep trying to doit all by myself all the time. It's just impossible. It's a grind thatnever ends and that's when focus blocks was born, which is basically the ideathat, instead of me doing the work by myself, how would I get other peoplewith me to join on a live coworking session? On Zoom- and we have you know,we have a structure to the call. We have a structure to that coworkingsession every hour on the hour and we bring people together and we have astructure to the call. The first five minutes get you into the prior to Ittyzone. Fifty minutes, like you, make your commitments than fifty minutes.You do the word and then five minutes is a de brief and then it starts allover again so that just started like a month and a half ago, two months ago itwas an idea and r right now we have our hundred members around the world and weare running at twenty two hours a day, twenty two hours a day Monday throughFriday, so twenty two focus blocks every single day, pretty soon we'll getto twenty four. So that's the fun part of this yeah. It's that's whar! Ithat's what I'm excited about it's. Actually, it is a great timing to getyou talking about this. Many, and hopefully you know if we continue thisas well, because it's basically a new start up that, like for the entire timeI've known you, you've, been focusing on two hundred books and talking aboutselling two thousand and three big number two thousand books, and you knowhow to turn that and grow. That has a kind of a coaching teaching information,Marketing Business and you've. You had this idea. I remember when you firstintroduced me to this. I that you I was like, so I have to pay a menthy feejust to show up on a zoom call to force myself to work, because other peopleare also on the zoom call, but no one's talking on the zoom call, and I know wehad a laugh- and I said to you. I said this is either a really genius idea, orit's just going to absolutely go nowhere. I think the the jury still out,but everything you're saying, is sounding very positive. Now I know,though, like the probably my skepticism was.This is not something I would do. I would sit down and work and I don'tfeel I would join a zoom called to force me, but you on the other side,really benefit from having that shared accountability of other people beingthere to work at the same time and there's obviously a lot of people likeyou on the planet who have the same kind of need that stimulation. So I'mgoing to I'm going to pass on to Gideon and just just asking this question aswell getting before we introduce your background, do you need like? Would youbenefit from jumping on a zoom call and having some other people there with youto help you get stuff done? I'm certainly intrigued back, because I dofind that working alone, most of the time from home, there's not muchaccountability. I mean I've been entrepreneur for fourteen years, and it's just me you know. If I don'twant to work, then I don't work that...

...can happen more often than may bepreferable. I'm so you know for productivity, but that will borrowthing is definitely very interesting as well found interesting. Many, how yousaid out sourcing will power in a way. I'm not sure. If those are the wordsyou use, but essentially saying you don't have enough, so you got to gethelp from somewhere else. So that's a really cool concept see. I think Ithink I would be. I mean. I'm definitely intrigued and I think it'dbe definitely worth the test to run it and see how it does this help meimprove productively, because I mean I guess from a psychological perspective,what it does it kicks in the social proof kind of thing, fromchilden right, where you know these other people sort of they're, notnecessarily watching you, but you kind of you know they're there. You know yousort of almost maybe it's sort of mimics being in the same room as theman. You don't want to be seen as the odd one, a that's not working andthat's slacking off. You know, so I can definitely see how that can play somegood tricks on your mind to help you actually do work got a question foryour man either like do with that system. Is The accountability just foractually sitting here and doing work, or does it give you some accountabilityfor the Fort for getting specific tasks donethat you want to get done so the process is that you know you join thefocus block at whatever hour you decide to join. We have a trained focus guidethat ill. Why walk you through a simple five minute process and the first fiveminutes are basically devoted to helping you become really focused andalso helping like asking you to make a commitment to what you will work onduring this hour as in what will you accomplish in this hour? So thatcommitment isn't noted in that chat or in the communication with the group sothat at the end of the hour, when everything is Sartin done, you canreport back and say: Okay. This is how much I got done and that's likeconstant feedback, constant, like commitment and feedback. So it's like,it brings a level of intentionality that normally we don't have isentrepreneurs. We just sit down to work like okay, I'm going to do this rightnow or I'm going to do this right now, but when you are forced to likeidentify clearly what you will accomplish in this hour, certainly itbecomes very real for you and you are much more focused on that one thing.Rather than spreading your energy all over the place. I love it. I love theconcept if thou're going to shake it out, yeah. Thank you just for those. Hething a focus blocks that I oh, if you want to check it out, I'm sure we'llgive him a shout out to everyone's projects. Getting who are you for thosewho don't know you? I am Giddy and shelwel they wanted only yeah. So I guess my story of entrepreneur starts back about.Fourteen years ago I had a decent job. You know, God qualified as anelectronic engineer, didn't like engineering as much so Idid another degree in engineering management and I enjoyed that more. Iworked for about five years in sort of business, development and projectordination sort of roles until I came to the realization- and it took me along time, but this you know sucked completely and it wasn't. I wasn't itwasn't what I thought it would be. Certainly didn't give me the freedomthat I was looking for. Didn't give me well didn't give me the freedom offinancial freedom. I didn't give me freedom of expression and definitelynot freedom of time. You know I felt like I was in jail in a way because Ialways had to be there at a certain time and leave at a certain time and itfelt like while I was at work, someone else kind of owned. My brain, you knowpsychologically because they were paying me to be there so they're payingfor my brain to be there retical, and so I had to use my brain to focus onthe task that I got paid for so it felt like kind of like a jail in a way, andthey just really exhausted me. So after five years I just said okay. This isenough. Let's told my wife, this is, we wereback in New Zealand still, and I said, let's just quit our jobs and emigrate to Australia and start freshand see, if I you know, maybe get a job first and then just to get a landingpad and start a business. Long Story...

Short got into Australia. Eventually, Icouldn't find a job. I woke got a job. She was paying the Bulls we we cameover with pretty much nothing. I think we had ten thousand and savingsthousand dollars came over with just just out back backs, basically was aclose and we stayed in a hotel for the first week,but in and second week we did find a place and that nothing. So we got it.We got a blow up mattress for our bed and whilewe were sort of waiting to figure things out- and I remember our firstfurniture we bought was to to bean bags and we still have thosebeen bags- they're, awesome, first tiny shore and then about a month later wehad some stuff coming on the ship which included my computer, and I don't know,I feel, a little bits and pieces, but not much. That's how I started youthat's about fourteen, maybe almost fifteen years ago now, so it was quitequite the beginning. But anyway you know. I didn't really know what I was.What I wanted to do. It was just kind of throwing the deep end andI had no idea absolutely no idea about business and just just started trying things youknow. I went to a. What do you call it a convention for Franchises- and Iremember walking through it- were one of the like one of these big halls inBrisband, I think, was the maist convention centre. I don't even know,but I remember walking past a dog washing franchise and looking athim going out. These guys have a franchise for washing dogs, so in otherwords they must have had a successful business for washing dogs to be able toturn it into franchise right, and they got me think o think if these guys canactually have a dog washing franchise. How hard can it be to start a business?You know be successful so, and I remember telling my wife something likea if I can't make back my salary that I was ending in my previous job. You knowwithin the First Year of being an entrepreneur, then I honestly don'tdeserve to be pay that much- and I I mean I was my salary who was, I think,fifty two thousand dollars which you know I thought I was a decent demandback then, but anyway, in the first year I made. Maybe I can't remember theexact numbers, but it's around about ten sand bucks and I spent maybe eleventhousand so made a loss of negative one thousand say runnin bout there and Iremember looking at my wife and going God did, make the money back. So Ididn't you know it was only worth negative thousand one thousand dollarsI didn't. I didn't really deserve to be paid that much and it was a wake upcall for me because it made me realize hey this there's something to this thisgame, it's different to being in a poor year. You could have a different mindset. That's it Ri said so. It took me a while to sort of unlearn the employingmind set and to learn how how to think like an entripled but eventuallyfigured out how to do it sided a bunch of projects. I had a bit of success inthe first six months when I wrote a book and someone promoted it for me andgot distributed to all over the world. But then you know rates out of southbecause didn't know anything about online business or have audible trafficor how to build a proper business, and then I really kind of struggled andjust trying to figure things out did sort of free lancing jobs, a videoproduction website, development, graphing sign all sorts of stuff inthis first year, just to sort sort of help, figure out the game and help PAthebes. I remember doing this starting this interview series, because Ithought: Hey there's a lot of people here, knowing how this game works. Whydon't we just interview them? This is this is back in two thousand and six, two thousand and seven runningback there. I started inserving people on video and the idea was that I wouldask them questions about success and learn from them recorded all andintended into like a membership website, and it all turned out to be way too muchwork for me. It kind of killed me. I've killed my computer, my p c back then,and that's how I eventually switched over to to Mac, but it also killed myspirits because it was. It was just too big that the project was just way to beso that never saw the light of day, but...

...one of the people I met during thatinto years was years taric the host the show. So I met Yaro and in one ofthem over to come to an interview at our little apartment. Had a greenscreen set up and we did the interview- and I remember your Yara- had long hairand was like it was incredibly hard to key out the background with aros curlylong hair. It was a nightmare anyway. We did it and anyway that's how afriendship started and and then we did a project to get a call, a become alogger back in the day that went really well. I got some great results fromthat and that was kind of like a massive stepping stern for me to tothen start building other businesses to, and so today have got a company calledsplash how I've always liked online video. So I've always been doing thatsince I've been been an entrepreneur, basically so its plash yer. Now webasically help people get the videos ready for social media, so we peoplesend us stave videos and then we transcribe them Bein. The tikincaptions rapid in a Nice Frame at a headline call to action, progress, avideo progress bar log animation whatever and seen the back o the videowith him twenty four hours, but it ready to publish and social media andby doing that, it helps people get floor, engaging on the videos- and Ijust removes that hassle of video production completely from the process.And yet I've been doing that now for well splashes been around since twothousand and twelve, but I had a bit of a break from it and and just got back toabout two and a half years ago. So so this latest vision of speshes onlyabout two and a half years ago- and that's that's Wot, I'm thing now lovingit awesome. Okay! So we kind of a brief intro. I mean t e to connect the dots.I know all these guys because of some connection to do with entrepreneurship.Nick and I I don't know if we got connected because of entrepreneurship-and we know we did initially because I went to your event that you were gohosting with some other friends of ours, but I feel like we connected with, likeroller blading, first more than business. I don't know Nick Rememberdoing that with you more than anything else back in Australia, but I'd love totalk a little bit with each of you like what you currently focus on,because obviously we could talk forever about our past. But what we're workingon right now is often what we would talk to each other about. I feel likeit's useful to often share what we're trying to do where we're getting stuckwhat's working, because that then in turn helps each other, because I learnwhat's working, what you're experimenting with and whether it'sinvesting or it's your current business, probably both sometimes there's someother topics, but that's maybe talk about the active, I would say businessE. I know nick you're not currently running your own business. We've tried.We've tried to get nick to start a company many times. All of us were notyou man, but I know I have, and I know Gideon has as well with Nick, neverquite got him over the line to bit to start something, but he's obviouslybeen involved with a lot of companies and hurly on as well. So I'm actuallygoing to start this topic by literally talking about what I did today. I thinkthis would probably connect greatly with with you nick, because I wasspending my entire day doing property management stuff. So in terms of myinvestment strategy, I am very much in many different buckets, one of thembeing property here in Montreal, where I currently live, actually moved toliberally to Montreal to take advantage of the the Montreal discount, as I callit, because property here is about half the price of Toronto and Vancouver andalso have the price of Melbourne Sydney Brisbane where were I'm from originallyin Australia. So I moved here and bought a TRIPLEX, and today I've beenbasically dealing with a couple of things: checking out repairs that haveoccurred due to water damage that hit my investment building and meeting mynew tenant for the first time as well, and I think like I guess I don't wantto really dive too deep into this. But I do want to surface this as a subject,because I know probably all of us have thought about property. A lot oflisteners are probably an improperty or...

...considered it and I'm finding it kindof annoying. To be absolutely honest, like it's never been my most favoriteway of investing, but there's a part of me. That's always sort of a littlevoice in the back of my head saying just hold on the properties, no matterhow much they challenge you, because in ten twenty years, you're going to bepanking yourself because of how much capital has a accrued and how you paiddown the loans over time with the rent and so on. But you know I've had burstpipes. I've had to two roof water leaks. I had you know a tenant leave twomonths early, so there's been a lot of negatives, and not only that Montrealis not structured well for property management. There's no like easyexternal services to have other people manage property for you. So what I'mfocusing on right now is actually turning my new tenant into a potentialproperty manager for the building. This is only because he's turned out to be ahandy man as well and because he lives in the building, he could potentiallyfix it. It's only like an idea: I've literally Hadd, just after meeting theguy, so I don't know how well it's going to work, but I'd love to maybethrow the ball over to you guys and what your experiences have been withproperty as an investment. If you have done any, I can I can. I can dive in sowe bought our first investment property and Little Rock in Arkansas last year,and that was something that I guess we've been sitting on the sidelines fora little while and trying to find the right starting point, and I think toback it up even like why property? It's because a lot of the other places thatI saw that we could be investing, I just couldn't find any sort of likestrong points of leverage or finding some advantage that I would bring tothe situation that I thought was going to be differentiated at along thelasting. I looked really sort of deeply into like quite active stock trading,and I tried that for a while- and I did know better than I a worse than just ifI'd done nothing. I looked at investing in startups and sort of angel roundsand that's something obviously that we've talked about in the past and atthe end of the day, it is like I'm going to be putting a lot of money intosomething that I may not see back and my ability to work out which one'sgoing to be a winner is not much better than anyone else. So why? Why do that?And then what got me excited about property? Is I had a good friend that Iused to work with WHO brought a couple of houses in Little Rock, which isactually where he grew up, so he knew the market. It was at a price pointlike a three bedroom, two bathroom house of a hundred and twenty fivethousand dollars, which you can get eight percent from the bank and you canrent it, such as a generates positive cash flo immediately. It's like okaywow. So all I need to come up with is thirty sand dollars and we can startand it's an ecosystem Puticuli in Little Rock, where for every sort ofchallenging point and all the things you just mentioned, I haven'texperienced yet, but I had a recommendation for a property manager.Who's been great and they've made it seamless, so so far so good, and it was a big changewhen looking at it compared to the bay area, which is where we were at thetime, because, like the property seen in the Bay areas, is insane people showup, they bid ten twenty thirty percent over asking they bring all cash theywave every contingency and, like that's, that's like maybe I'll, have that kindof financial profile one day, but that's certainly not where I am today,and I would see my friends like go all in on stuff that just like, obviouslythey were, they were excited about it. But it looked to me like a really crazy kind of bit and if something wentwrong, if they made a bad decision, if, if the market turned against them, likeas it did a little bit last year like there wasn't a lot of backup plans. Sothat's that's. What really got me excited about some of these othermarkets around the US, where you can bring a lot less money. You candiversify a lot more sort of readily and you can plug in sort of othersystems quite affordable. So I remember I was. I was blown away when we boughtthis investment property. We needed to...

...get some minor repairs done like gotthe bill from the property management company and it was like two hundreddollars to get a fence repaired. It's like you can't get anything done in thebay area for two hundred L. I don't know what's like in Montreal that Isort of looked at this, and it's just like I is this, like part of the fence,is there another bill coming? Have you forgot to put you on large on the topof this? Have you like already taken my money from somewhere else and you'vededucted against, like the full first month's rent and two hundred dollars iswhat I owe. In addition, it sounds like you crane prices to me yeah and I waslike wow okay. I think we can make this work I'm jealous as all I can say sofar. NICEAS you've had no problems besides, you know combred what I've had,but I think some of that's just luck with a draw of what kind of buildingyou get to. I know like we're, not necessarily all interested in propertyor have done much of the property I'll, let many and get in if you want toshare anything with property. But if you don't, I think it is fun to talkabout like your kind of core investment strategy and Nick Ye did a greatexplanation as to why you've decided to begin this experiment with property.It's something that you felt you could control the variables you liked thenumbers involved and it compared beneficially or compared to the otherthings you had tried, or looked at so far manny. What's your story with withit with property or a investing yeah, so investing but like when, I think ofall the money the time put to work most of it is in passive stock marketinvestments. In the sense I don't actively manage anything kind of likewhat nick was alluding to you trying to do it myself. I never had any goodsuccess with it, so it's more of index ons and such that the money sitting inand the interesting thing is. I think I always thought or I've always stillbelieved, that the only investment other than that I want to make is in mybusiness. So I'm like whatever I could do all the money. I need I'm just goingto keep pumping into the business t and that's going to be the like. Instead ofdiversifying like, I got a diversified, safe portfolio, that's sitting there,but then now all the risk is on the business side of things and I'm puttingall of my offert time energy on business as to my biggest investment interms of me fully wested into it. So I think of my business as the biggestinvestment in every shape or form, and I feel like I took this kind of ratherpersonally, when I was reading Mark Cubans book, He talked about the idea that you knowif you're gonna, if you're going to be an entrepreneur,he having a house can be one of the biggest liabilities because it can bogyou down. It can slow you down in all those things and I'm not sure if thatwas the perfect answer that he like that was that was there, but just I just believed in what Mark Heman wassaying at the time, and I was like all right, I'm just going and I'm justworking on my business and nothing else. Matters and business is all that I likeI have I'm basically like. If you want to call it par bell right. I havereally safe investments, but then I have very risky investment, which is mybusiness, which can go belly up any given day. So that's kind of mystrategy. What's the end game, I know you don't necessarily know it yet. Butwhat is the plan if you're, all in on your business as your kind of strategyfor growing your capital? What do you? How do you see that playing out likewhat do you want out of that? How many? What do I? What do I want out ofgrowing the business in terms of yeah? I, if you're going to put so much timein energy and resources into the business? Is it about one day sellingit? Is it hoping it will just return a lot of cash like what? How do you yeah?How do you see it plume? Not both these businesses are kind of cash lotbusinesses they aren't really designed for the traditional startup methodologyin some ways and yeah. I don't really plan on sellingany of them. If anything, I feel like focus blocks is the future of what'sgoing to happen with when my businesses in the sense, I see, focus blocks asthe as the current like as the way...

...forward for me and the current FocusBlok, which is like one hour like twenty four hours of accountable, ityand parter. That's just one piece of the oral prior Tory puzzle. I see usbeing able to create a lot of back end products and services and things likethat selling to corporations and really taking in it. I want people to never work alone,that's kind of my Marton like that's what I feel with Focus Bok and neverwork alone, and that's the vision. I have a focus box, so no, I have nointention of selling it or even like thinking about you know getting out ofit in any way, ship or form. I just want to grow this Tam business as muchas I can, and you know, take it to millions of people. If you can't dothat, yeah is funny like and we'll throw it you in a second getting. But Ihear you say this. First of all, I love the no one work alone as a phrase thatthat's so, I guess applicable now, with sort of the work at home, lifestylethat we've ill been living it's being at home, but not being alone. If that'ssomething you can help with that's amazing, but I like this idea of you- have a vision for a company, but,let's be honest, manny you didn't have this company two months ago, so it'slike talking go now. It's like well, you've got so much energy behind this,but this company didn't exist and your your energy was sort of more around twothousand books Com and what was going on there. But I feel there was aconnection between this whole concept. If you want to make people moreproductive, so, maybe and correctly from wrong, it's kind of like acombination of a passion for a subject, but also obviously wanting to see avery profitable business be born from whatever you do in that subject, yeah the biggest reason why I feel liketwo thousand books has been like or I've. The reason why I focus on muchmore on focus blocks now compared to thousand books is because I always feltlike to tother books for so dependent on me. I had become the Personi Y hadbecome the face, never really wanted that, but that's what it has been andthat's what it always be, and I always felt like that was going to be limitedin terms of scope in terms of what we can do with it. There's a ceiling whenI am the one who's delivering value in their business, but with focus blocks.I am not delivering any value in the business I'd. Rarely if ever do any, Ido not I'm not a focus guide on. Maybe I do two hours a week of being a focusguide. The remaining time is actually other people on our team who do thatwork right, the twenty two hours a day, someone else doing it. So it's likethis is where it's totally scalable, because I don't have to be involved inthe day today, operations in any way shape or form, and I have a greatoperations manager. She takes care of. So many of these things that I onlyfocus on marketing and selling the damn thing- and I feel like this is whereit's truly scalable, while two thousand books was always going to be limitedbecause I had to be the content guy, I had to be the book reader guy. I had tobe everything and also be the marketing mind and all those things. So that'swhy I truly believe in focuss blocks and, as you know, I probably createdmore prod activity courses than any other on any other areas in business orin in personal development, because I've always been a geek about priortimity. So this is something like where my passion meets the opportunity andthe market is willing to pay for it kind of like what good to grade talksabout Jim Collins talks about in the book right was to passion what themarket needs and what you know or yeah. What's The Passion? What's the marketneeds and what they're willing to pay for it and what we can be the best at,and I truly fear we could be the best at this whole game of proactively. It'snot really all that difficult. Given every day. I record testimonials withpeople literally because they come in so fast and furious, like I just haveto say: Hey. Are you having a good experience and they're like yes, my Godright, let's record it Tasio's like every day I get new people and withintwo days they are like fans and I'm like all right. This is way more fire than two thousand a seer was yeah it'd be fun. Maybe if we keep doingthese sort of regular calls, we can...

...keep track of the numbers as times goupon, but I feel like as you're saying some of the things about not being theface of the company the brand. It's reminding me of some conversations withyou get in about you not wanting to necessarily always be the face and thebrand and and even struggling with that, because you know how powerful, having alead figure as the brand is for your company, and we also have to know whatyou're focused on right now, because we got to get your side of that. Thatquestion as well. That's a pretty big question on like this. Is You knowwhether you how you build Your Business? You knowwhether you go down their pesonal brand sort of path or building a brand like acompany brand, and I maybe do both and how you combine them in the bestpossible way, and I mean I the exact same sentiment as you. Many you know wethat ten years ago, our first eleven years now our first child was born. Alittle daughter was his big big enough. You know asked myself the question ifsomething El back, then I had a business that was fully depending on mybrain again. You know it was scalar. T was, you know, made some good money veryhighly profitable. However, there's two things I couldn't do with it: one is, Icouldn't sell it and to I couldn't I couldn't run without me. You know sothat was a problem. So when my daughter was born, I became a lot more sort ofreal is like something happens to me and what happens to the family, and Iis my wife- can't work in a shoe as looking after he lotte baby. You knowat what then, and that's when I started splasher- that's that's very soon.Actually well nick and I actually we started flickdisk a little bit before splash. It was another. We never never actually sawthe day of lie that particular one. We had some good weird had some reallygood fun with that, and we remember that at that big presentation we didand yeah I mean it's like one of the startups that makes that ninety percentto fail yeah and it was it- was a really bigcity. Only time we ever got nick to be doing a business to getting. I shouldgive you credit. You actually got him that far to start excelling I mean Iknow it. It was a lot of fun. I I can't remember how long we spent on it. Maybesomehow I've got six months in my head, for you know as working. I remember wedid one really big project and and probably bent us out of it, but that'smay be another story to talk about, but anyway that was that was the first sortof brand branded kind of business that I started the in splashy. You know wellSi soon after that and and the idea there was that we that I could build abusiness that could run independently offer me, but that I could also sell ifI wanted to later on. You know to give me that choice, not that I necessarilywanted to, but I wanted to have the choice in case I did get sick of it allin case my life situation changed an I wanted to have that choice. So splashhow's been that also built. Another company called Virole sold my shes andthat about two and a half years ago, and that's when I jumped back on thesplash or again and yeah there's still the big question. Is it still importantto have a personal brand and I don't think it's necessary if you've got acompany brand, but it can be helpful. I think it can definitely be helpful forpromotional purposes for trust building and that sort of thing, but I really like the idea of having aseparate brand separate from you that can run independently of you that cangrow independently of you, that you can market and promote and andindependently of you, and that you know definitely sell as well without yourface being in it. That's I think that that's hugely beneficial, because itcan I kind of becomes a thing in and of itself in the biding of you and that'sgreat. I think, there's there's there's a lot of value in that so yeah I don'tknow. Who is the question going? I mean what are we doing now and investmentsyeah? I want to sort of come back to this big questionof investment in like for me. Is Entrepreneur especially like what,especially once you start making money? Where do you start investing it? Wheredo you wish the best place to have your money and, like many was saying likeyou know, for us in a similar way, we've mainly been investing it to rightback into the business on it's not like, I'm I in experience necessarily in orlike I've, never thought about a...

...basement like before I became aentrepreneur. I was actually like a semi full time, currency trader, and sowe traded US dollars with Swiss frank they were for that. We tried. I can'tremember all these act details, but it was incredibly intense and it was a daytrading as well. I so because you wouldn't call an investment as such,but some of the principals were very similar, so we did more chart technicaltrading as uppose to find a mental training, but we did pay attention tothe fundamentals as well. So I did that for about two or three years and didoptions treading. I start of options trading and started, went into currentcituation and basically got really burnt out. I could completely burnt outfrom current Trin, because what I was doing is like I had my full time. JobStarted at seven Dan seven o'clock in the morning with finish it three gethome, run about four o'clock and have a quick bite or whatever and e starttrading or back trainings, like most of your time, goes into back trading, Tiswith technical training or analysis, backtrail and and maybe putting somepositions in at about ed o'clock and between you have dinner as well infront of the computer, who I would have dinner my wife and bring me dinner,just amazing, and then basically, trade back trade chap my treading partneruntil about eleven o'clock at night, and I did that for about a year andthen the not strategy changed, and it would meant that I had to get up at that same routine. So seven o'clockstart in the morning get how it for start trading about four thirty fiveo'clock, whatever and and then till eleven o'clock at night go to bed andthen for this new thing. I had to get up at three o'clock in the morning toclose our positions. We couldn't automatic back then, and so it's up forabout half an hour to an hour. Now I don't know about you guys, but I needmy sleep and when it gets interrupted, I'm not a not a happy curson the nextday. That's my wife. For the last eleven years, we've had kids, you knowbeing interrupted from sleep. It's not it's not a good thing for me. I don'thandle that. Well, anyway, did that for a month- and I was just dead- you knowat the end of that I was just going okay. This is this is like a wig, terPuttin me, and I was just going. What do I want to do? Do? Do I want to be ina like a traitor. Is that what I want to spend my life on it? Do I just wantto look at charts all day long and look at numbers going up and down all day,long and and kind of get addicted to that thrill of winning and, and youknow, losing money at the end of it. It kind of seemed like gambling to me in away, because at the end of that you could never predict what the market isgoing to do accurately like you. Could you could you could always predict onyour back trading? You can go okay, according to my back trading. This isyou know you work out of system right and you go okay. According to this, itshould do this to this sort of percentage and and what so interestingabout that was that, even though on our back trading or results would be likewe'd find these systems that would just be. We would get like two thousandreturn on investment sort of strategies like it was crazy. It was just like youknow from on or back trading, but they would implement it and me we'd losemoney and we go a what's what's wrong here and then we would trace back we'd,go look at a lot of transactions and go what the heck happened. What a way youknow for the last month, we were supposed to make like a two thousandpercent and we turn on on investment. What do we lose everything and or not just lose everything Magi made alost as well, because it was really liverage trade and- and we came torealize that the only simple answer was that it wasdue to human error every single time, so every single time that we'd losemoney or that the trade wouldn't work or the system wouldn't work. It wasn'tbecause of the system as because of the human error. You know like you and youthink, Oh you just missed this one it'll be all right or you just makethat little era there and be all right in a long scriptis after a month or sixmonths ago, hang on all those little like you miss one. Big Trade can wipeout your profits for the whole month. You know so so so then I I said this is. This isjust not my game. I realized that that it was just not my game, it wasn't mygame for wealth building and for for...

...being happy and- and that is part ofthe reason why I become entrepen I wanted to. I wanted to create somethingso for my personality. It really makes sense to create and creating businessesis fun for me, like I love the idea of creating a business like coming up withnew designs, new new products reaching new markets, it's all very creative inin in and of Erself, and that excites me that gives me energy and doingtrading and a business sort of stuff doesn't give me energy. It takes myenergy away, so so my strategy now really is well at at least short a termfor it. The Beginning Days of being entrepreneur is to put all my energy ormy assets or my money, whatever I could into the business and to have only oneegg in the basket not to diversify it at all, and the reasoning behind thatis to give me the best possible chances to success because it's rigged in a way,but it's rigged towards my interests and passions and and natural talents,and also in an area that I'm really knowledgeable and so, for example, it'sit's in the video marketing space. I'm really passionate about that. I lovevideo is very creative. It s a very visual and there's a lot of people whoare interested in it. So it's really it's rigged for success. So with me,putting all my eggs into one basket or just one egg in one basket is I've gota much better, much better chance of success. That's my view anyway, andthen the longer term vision is that as the business make money- and this iswhere we we are sort of moving into now with our current stage, life is his.You know, as the business becomes really profitable. You know we can'tinvest that money fast enough back into the business. So now we go to ask thequestion: Okay, you'll, just keep that money in the bank where it's endingalmost. I think it's one percent interested them mom here, Australia ordo we do something a bit smarter with it and then the next question is: Ifyou want to do something smarter with it like either will state or paperassets or or other businesses? Do we do it ourselves? Do we take some time outout of our schedule away from our business and become experts, so speakat these other investment vehicles? Or do we find someone else, who's alreadyan expert and just get them to do it for us and give them a cut? You knowgive them a. You know: Pay Them at whatever the commissions are orwhatever whatever that structure is whatever that deal is, and so so that'ssort of h, h the place we're out of the moment. We had some experience inbuying a house before and it was the dumbest decision for us a entrepreneursiver. It took all our capital away. It was just after the financial crisis,two thousand advenit there, and then we went we. It was a terrible house. Welived in the ours, I wouldn't even call it an investment, it wasn't aninvestment, I wouldn't put it under the investmentcategory was we bought the house because we were cash rich and wethought a head doesn't matter where you live et cetera because we were fromhome, but it was a bad decision. It was a really bad decision and we lost six Dwhen we saw that house that was terrible and like a year of our lives,it was just his just terrible disaster. So so you know I think, going forward.It would be now we wouldn't, if we by a house for us it wouldn't be fun busienecessarily, but we would certainly be interested in working with someone elseto help us with invistment properties or investing in some sort ofdiversified port failure. where, with someone else who we trust and who's gota good proven crack record of success, they do n the investments for us andthen, in the meantime, we keep focusing on our business, we're in a place thatwe're really good at and bit up that acid, a net cashle as much as we canand then keep on going, westing that cast or not using the business into allthese other assets. So that's that's kind of the over all big big picturestrategy for us. I appreciate you guys are diving into like your your kind ofinvestment philosophies. You can see the kind of similarities, especiallylike many and guiding you guys are both talking about putting a lot of yourenergy and almost all of it into your companies at the moment and Kitin. Youactually reminded me when you said like with the investing you know. If youmiss one day when the market had its...

...big gain or you know like I remember aman, you can corect me if I'm wrong, I think it's Tony Robins, I'm assumingknow everything about every book. Many, but Tony Robin's Book Money Master thegame. I think it was, and he was saying like if you you just leave your moneyin there was like the advice from all the biggest wealth creators, but therisk is there's two or three days in a ten year period where the biggest gainshappen, and if you miss those days you are actually going to be. You knownegative for your results over those ten years, so the trick ers just don'ttouch it. I'd like to kind of throw a nick here because Nick I can't say that you have the samething with one to throw all your energy into your own business and I've alwaysbeen kind of curious how your motivation works with a job because you've had some fun jobs inthe past, but at the same time you don't you don't get to control yourtime quite the same way and- and I think that's great you're here, becauseyou do give give us an input and they'll- probably a lot of people.Listening to this who are in jobs and probably you know, I think they mightbe thinking, side houses and might be thinking leave one day or they might bejust thinking. Let's take what I make from my job and you know, grow it asmuch as I can using investment vehicles. So I love to know your overall kind ofphilosophy around where you put your energy, you know into and was call it acareer, because that's what you've got right all right. So I feel like I haveto have to even walk this back again and offer a correction, because when we first got together sort of I'ddone a couple of my iron startups and it's probably generous to call themstartups. I think sort of flick desk with Gideon was the one that was thatof the most formal. But before that I was running my own business. What wasthat just so we can so we all know what was it was the lie desk. It was anonline video, editing marketplace and I still think it's a really good idea.That's actually. The way you describe splasher earlier reminds me of some ofthe early dreams that we had for it, but we were way too early and theInternet infrastructure was just never going to be where it needed to be forthat model at that time to work, and I think it's a classic example of goodidea, bad timing, but but before that sort of I was, I was running my ownbusiness in Australia and I was frustrated with it because I was theone sort of in the same way that many described just like. I was the in themiddle of everything and at the time I didn't have the knowledge or the skillsto extract myself from that. So I was sort of doing a bad job of creating apipe line of new clients, and I would go from that feast or famine cycle andjust bounced through that, every three months, where I'd suddenly win somebusiness and be then super busy to execute against that, but have any timefor sort of regeneration and nurturing perspective clients, I'd clear thoseprojects and then I'd be like great. I'm not getting paid. This week, Ohdear, I've got to go and out find more clients, and that was just bouncingaround, and I I did that for a few years and I got to work on a lot ofinteresting. What was it? There was a company that I ran called digitaldigitally digital done different, I think, actually is probably a terriblename looking back in it now, but it was essentially an agency model. I E nowand I got burned out on it. I was bored and that was then sort of the triggerfor trying and exploring different things and that's ultimately, what ledme to joining a start up and during an early stage start up where I had theopportunity to be men toward by people who were much sort of more experiencedin building a company and structuring a sales and marketing team structuring aproduct and a development team. Looking at all the various keep eyes andmetrics and operations that you need to then scale that business out and it wasfantastic and I work a lot and I became a very valuable and marketable skillthat I was like good at and I really played to my strength, sort of in theI'm, the I suppose, classic generalist role. I like to know a little bit abouteverything, but it's difficult for me to go super deep on one particulartopic and that's essentially what product management as a career is, Ithink, really like the best way to...

...think about product management. Is it'sit's touching on every area of the business and the only other person thatreally gets to do. That is the COR. But you don't carry that stress in thatrisk and those sort of night terrors of okay. Is this going to work tomorrowand that's been? It's been really good for me for the last ten years. So Ithink when I was thinking about sort of investment and sort of like what are mymotivations and sort of strategies there. I think, first of all, it's todo work, that's interesting and valuable to the world and to do it withlike people I admire and respect, and to have that collaboration on a day,Tay Basis that I think it's really hard to get as an entrepreneur like the. Thechallenge that I see with focus block is exactly what I sort of experience inmy own role. Now that covets happen to were all remote is like. We don't getthat interaction on Datae basis in the office and that's that's sort of a really hard thing to replacequickly by then doing your own start up, and now that I have a family and I have atwo year old, I'm much more as pose considerate of optimis, for he, thelong term like happiness and success of the family unit, not just myself. It'slike if my wife was not here. If my two year old was out here, then I'd be mucheasier for me to do like I'm, gonna go and quit my job and I'm going to godown and do a side house of, because that's what I'm excited about this weekand the price of failure is not too high in that situation, but when sortof you've got a family around you that's my chest. My thinking on that ischanged dramatically in the last sort of two three is true, so true, kidschange everything down there yeah I mean they changed things in like twoyear olds and a completely different dimension than you never expected. It'slike one of the things. I think that I've been most conscious over the lasttwelve months is. Is it like my son? is wonderful and adorable, but he's energydraining and like the kinds of things that he can do that are also enjoyablefor me, are like this big and they don't last for more than about twentyor thirty minutes like reading him, some books is it's pretty fun for bothof us, but everything else he wants to do is not so much fun for me, soboredom creeps in really quickly and then we need to find ways to managethat, and that's been a big part of my learning cut there is was working out.Well, how do I? How do I leverage my time moreeffectively? How can I sort of bring in various services to the home whether itbe like a cleaner or sort of out sourcing, various different tasks, sothat I can devote the the lion share? My time to my job and I can then stillhave energy and brain power in the end of the day to like, where do we need tobe going as a family and setting those goals over the next at a six twelvemonths, five years, so that, like we're able to live the kind of life that wewant in the long term, not just sort of have it as a Sunday one day, kind ofthing? Well, when we retire in twenty years time, hopefully that'll all be inplace, I'm much more interested to really actively manage that thatquality of life and think about the different tools that wehave to our advantage. I think, having like a good job, gives you a lot ofadvantages that entrepreneurs often don't have weight. You can go to a bankand you can ask for a loan and you can buy a house and that can be morechallenging when you sort of don't have a job and you're sort of in the earlydays of building a company where it's like well, where's. Your in coming wasyour business and it's like. Well, I don't have that yet, but it's coming sothat's those are the kind of challenges and sort of things that I try and applydifferent strategies to. It's not to say I on never do a starter, but Ithink, like the path of the next few years, is probably not that I want to also just mention somethinghere that that nick sparked the idea for as you grow your family as you asyou start getting more kids, your expenses increase and increasesignificantly. It's not like it's just a few dollars or whatever, like ourexpenses, v increased significantly since we've started getting children-and I remember a friend of mine, saying once it's quite an influential guy. Hehad four boys, I think three or four...

...boys, and he made this comment inpassing. Once someone say that kids are expensive right and he said yeah, theycost millions, and I thought he was joking, because that before we had kidsor at the beginning and now looking back at that comes of quite a few yearsago, going Ah Yeah. I can see how that is very true. It's maybe not millionswithin the first year, but you can it all up over a ten year twenty yearperiod, it really is millions. You know like it can be millions I, depending onyou know where you living and what what school you send your kids to, andespecially when you factoring opportunity cost as well of all thatenergy and that brain space that was consuming because you didn't get a goodnight's sleep and therefore you weren't able to do as good a job as you wantedto the next day, and then that adds up over time and that's a good tip. I'veoften thought about that. Nick and thinking as it has it helped my careeror is it, as you know, detracted from and Er changes your risk profile, whichis a lot of money as well. Right because when you cristoval changes, youare not going to go after the big swings anymore. You get out of play anda little more controlled fashion. I never thought of opportunity cost thanchildren before that is. That is an interesting angle to think about there,mostly because most people talk about children in such a life changing way,and I should clarify myself and manny- do not help children nick and Gideon doGideon a little further along with his larger family of slightly olderchildren than Nick, but still it's yeah. I I it'll certainly play a partin all of our decision making, but yeah opportunity cost of children, it I'msure, there's some people out there we sit down with a pennant paper and go. Icould shoot for the stars with the company or make a baby and and that's atwo very different things, but they impact each other significantly. Well,I want to say this because I think it's really important. You know some fromthis conversation. People might think. Oh you, when you have children may bemay be, have a less chance of succeeding and I'm not sure if that'strue I've, I think, as you get children, you become more motivated to dosomething amazing with your not just with your life, but also you know, toprovide for your family. That certainly becomes one of your primary drivers,but then also there's something else that happens inside of you. That goes.I'm want to do something that that makes a difference. There's certainlyan aspect of that that kicks in an maybe it's driven by the survivalinstinct. You know to go: Hey, I've got kids. Now, I've got to I've got to workextra hard now or I've got to I've got to work extra smart now to because Idon't have much as much time as before. I've got to think more about leverageand I've got to think more about. How do I build the teams that don't have todo everything myself anymore, so I don't burn out so that I can spend moretime with the family. So I think all those building a family is actuallyreally good for business and for going to say, you're making you makingchildren sound like a focus block like you make the baby, and that means yougot to work very focused on the time you're not with the baby right. Well it.I think this. This there's nothing more motivating than when you're startingfrom scratch and there's a new baby on the way, and you don't have a job, andyou don't have much money to make a success like when that baby is coming.You Go. I have to do something because there are so dependent the a hundredpercent depending on you. The little baby t they're completely helpless whenthey're born- and you know when in the first few weeks the mom you know, momcan't do much you know, and if this so so you, I think it's one of the mostmotivating things in the world to make something work when you have that, soit's I'd certainly been the case. You know for me, like, I think,specifically for our third child, that we definitely had that sort of scenarioplay off very well. We were in a situation where things didn't goaccording to plan like we thought and we kind of had to start from scratchagain and then there's a new baby on the way it's like, Oh okay, nice one,so, but that really that really like sound like you're, not responsible forthat I now well, it's anotherstory!...

Okay shop is your focus, sharpens yourfocus and helps superis yeah totally you sort of just go okay. Should I goout to this thing, or should I go to this event? Is going to help thebusiness you know and help us become financially independent, and the answeris no. You just go there's no chance of going if it's not going to bebeneficial for for the goal that you have for your business of your familyis just becomes really easy to send out you things. So I know we hit about anhour here and I know we've all got the things to do children to attend, toslash businesses to grow or focus blocks to attend to as well. So I wantto be, you know, cognisant at right time frames, let's wrap it up.Obviously this is an experiment for all of US experiment for me to put this outin the podcast feed and for the listener, see if you guys get any valuefrom it. From my point of view, we obviously have three guys: who'vesucceeded in different things and some overlap as well, and obviously you knowwe're not just talking businesses we're talking about fatherhood here as wellwere- and I am totally interested in taking this wherever it goes. I think one thing we need is a name I'mgoing to throw that out. The all three of you guys I'd love to give this aname for our kind of calling a sub show on my podcast plus topic. So I'm nowthrowing this out to the audience and to my co host fears. We know we don'twant be to rambling every episode. It would be great to kind of have somekind of direction. I listened to a lot of other sort of podcast that it's axlebecoming like a thing that is four guys on a podcast,I'm sure there's four women on a podcast out there too, on some shows,but often it's like very news focused. You know people talking about what ishappening right now and with it, whether it's technology or business orlife, or whatever, I'm totally open to taking this wherever it goes, but I'dlove to get feak from the audience to so the any subjects you guys want us tocover, obviously, for a lot of you, nick many and Gideon might be completeblank slates. You only know them to the extent you've heard today, so we'llbuild out your background story and personality is a bit more to goingforward, because I think it's helpful when it comes to coming up with newtopics to also feel like you guys, contribute in those areas too. I knowyour strength, some of them anyway, but will the audience will get to know themmore over time as well anyway? I'm just saying all this to convince these guysto keep doing the show with me, because, obviously there's an experiment forthem as well, and we can have guests on to. We can always throwing out. Youknow, bring on some where other our friends and head down the directions,but I'm going to call it a day if you guys are a good. If you want to anylast minute things to say before we hit the the end on the recording, I'mgetting dead silence from these guys, so we're going to call it done we'regoing to think about a name and yeah good to see you and thanks all three ofyou for for joining me. Thank you have are so there you have it our first evergroup podcast without a name as yet. So if you do have any ideas for a name forour show, if you have any feedback or if you'd like to send us a question,all you have to do is send me an email Yaro at Yaro do log or just leave it asa question or a comment in reply to any of the places I post this podcast toall my social media. You Tub my blog and I'd love to hear from you. We'renot sure whether we want to keep doing this show or not we're going to verymuch base it on whether we're enjoying it and whether you are responding to itas an audience and hopefully we'll stick to it on some kind of regularschedule. And ideally we can answer some of the questions and covers fromthe topics you would like us to cover. If you just give us that feedback andif you really brave, send to an audio file with your question and yourcomment and I'll play it on the episode for myself and the guys to reply toalso if you haven't yet done so subscribe to the best of capital,podcast just open up whatever APP, you currently used to listen to podcast,whether it's on your phone or your computer and hit that subscribe button.So you get all my interviews that I release and I'm doing quite a few now Igot a lot cued up for the future, with some amazing people making money inplaces like real estate with poker with cannabis. So many great stories, even afew billionaire stories coming up from...

...people who have launched star ups thathave gone on to IPO and be worth over a billion dollars. So Unicorn founders aswell. If you like that sort of thing subscribe and also dig into thearchives, lots of amazing interviews with some seven eight and even now,nine figure entrepreneurs in my show and spread. The word really wouldappreciate it if you're getting value from what I'm doing, let others knowmore people, listen the more great people I can get on as guests and doamazing interviews for you, okay, my name is Yaro and I'll talk to you onthe very next episode by Bye, O.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (78)